Moving in May! Look How Far You Have Walked!


View FlyLady 2014 Virtual Walking Tour in a larger map

What a beautiful world we live in! Spring is in the air and May is a fantastic month for moving! Moving is FLYing! This year we will be enjoying all of the beautiful educational locations across our globe during our Virtual Walking Tour. We will be exercising our bodies and our minds! Don’t forget, every 15 minutes equals 1 mile! Check often and record your minutes. Moving is such a wonderful way to to lift your spirits, stay healthy and have more energy. Let’s make this month’s habit stick for the rest of the year!

19. UTC Challenger STEM Learning Center, Chattanooga Tennessee 

ChallengerCenter_03

Hints for walking there:

This place is one of many built as a living memorial for the crew of the Challenger Space Shuttle mission that ended in tragedy in January of 1986.
This is a place where students can explore hands-on science, technology, engineering and math programs.
This particular location is in Chattanooga, Tennessee.

Interesting facts:

The UTC Challenger STEM Learning Center is a member of the National Challenger Center Network that has 45 centers located in the United States, Great Britain, South Korea and Canada.
The UTC Challenger Center opened in 1994 and was the first center integrated with a University Campus.
Programs include simulated space missions that reinforce and introduce students to real-world applications of STEM principles, summer camps, teacher professional development workshops, and team building sessions for businesses and other organizations.
The Challenger programs serves approximately 8000 students and several hundred teachers each year in a service area that includes Tennessee, Georgia, Alabama, North Carolina, and South Carolina.

18. National Dinosaur Museum, Canberra, Australia 

National-Dinosaur-Museum-Resize

Hints for walking there:

It is the southern hemisphere’s largest permanent display of prehistoric specimens.
It also has the largest dinosaur hall in the World.
This place is located in Canberra, Australia.

Interesting facts:

Starting from humble beginnings in 1993, the museum has grown from just a small collection to housing the largest permanent display of dinosaur and other prehistoric fossil material in Australia.
With 23 complete skeletons, and over 300 displays of individual fossils, the museum continues to grow and expand our collection and our depth of information.
With an annual patronage of 100,000 visitors, the museum is one of the most popular attractions in the Australian Capital Territory.
The museum’s exhibits take you on a journey through time, from the Earth’s very beginnings to some of the most recent animals. Through this you can follow the evolution of life, and see just how successful the dinosaurs were.

17. Royal Belgian Institute of Natural Sciences, Brussels 

Brussels


Hints for walking there:

This place was founded on 31 March 1846 as a descendant of the Musée de Bruxelles of 1802.
It is located in Brussels.
The dinosaur hall of the museum is the world’s largest museum hall completely dedicated to dinosaurs.

Interesting facts:

Its most important pieces are 30 fossilized Iguanodon skeletons, which were discovered in 1878 in Bernissart.
Since 2007, a completely renovated and enlarged dinosaur hall (the Janlet wing) of 4580 m² is the largest dinosaur hall in the world.
In 1860 the skeleton of a mammoth was found near Lier and was brought to the museum (on display since 1869). At that time the only other skeleton of a mammoth was on display in the museum of Saint Petersburg (Russia).
Like in most museums, there is a research department and a public exhibit department.

16. Museum für Naturkunde (MfN), Berlin Germany 

Berlin

Hints for walking there:

This place houses more than 30 million zoological, paleontological, and mineralogical specimens, including more than ten thousand type specimens.
Established in 1810, it is the largest museum of natural history in Germany.
It is located in Berlin.

Interesting facts:

The museum houses more than 30 million zoological, paleontological, and mineralogical specimens, including more than ten thousand type specimens.
It is famous for two spectacular exhibits: the largest mounted dinosaur in the world, and an exquisitely preserved specimen of the earliest known bird, Archaeopteryx.
Important historic zoological specimens include those recovered by the German deep-sea Valdiva expedition (1898–99), the German Southpolar Expedition (1901–03), and the German Sunda Expedition (1929–31).
Additional exhibits include a mineral collection representing 75% of the minerals in the world, a large meteor collection, the largest piece of amber in the world; exhibits of the now-extinct quagga, huia, and tasmanian tiger, and “Bobby” the gorilla, a Berlin Zoo celebrity from the 1920s and 1930s.

15. Holocaust Museum, Houston Texas 

holocaust museum

Hints for walking there:

Their mission is to make people aware of the dangers which prejudice, hatred and violence brought about.
This place is located in Houston Texas.
It is the 4th largest of its kind in the United States.

Interesting facts:

The Holocaust Museum Houston, is located in the Houston Museum District in Houston, Texas and was opened in 1996.
The museum promotes understanding, remembrance and education with the goal that both students and the general population stay and become aware of the lesson of these tragic events. This lesson is that humankind must strive to live together in peace and harmony.
The museum’s “Curriculum Trunks Program,” which is available for teachers throughout the country, gives teachers of all grades multi-media tools such as videos, posters, CDs, CD-ROMS, artifact kits, maps, classroom sets of books, lessons plans and plans for student activities so that classes are as informative as possible.
Members of the Holocaust Museum Houston have access to the Boniuk Library. This lending library has more than 5,000 volumes on the Holocaust, the post-Holocaust era, Jewish history, World War II and other similar topics.
There are permanent as well as temporary exhibitions at the Holocaust Museum Houston. An important part of the permanent exhibition, which is called “Bearing Witness: A community remembers,” is the testimony of Houston-area survivors.

14. The United States Army Heritage and Education Center (USAHEC), Carlisle, Pennsylvania

USAHEC

 

Hints for walking there:

This place was formed in 1999 and reorganized in 2013.
It is located in Carlisle, Pennsylvania.
Their motto is “Telling the Army story, one Soldier at a time.”

Interesting facts:

The United States Army Heritage and Education Center (USAHEC), is the U.S. Army’s primary historical research facility.
the center consists of the U.S. Army Military History Institute (USAMHI), the Army Heritage Museum (AHM), the Digital Archives Division, the Historical Services Division, the Research and Education Services, and the USAHEC Staff.
The U.S. Army Heritage and Education Center’s mission is to make historical materials available for use to support the U.S. Army, educate an international audience, and honor Soldiers – past and present.
The current research collection contains military history books, military newspapers, technical and field manuals, periodicals, veteran’s surveys, photographs, and transcribes oral histories. The collections include material from as early as the French and Indian War to current U.S. Army operations.
“The Soldier Experience” is located in the Visitor and Education Center (VEC) of the USAHEC campus and is open during normal business hours. When exploring the gallery, visitors experience the U. S. Army through the eyes of the men and women who lived its history, in war and peace, from the Spanish–American War to current operations in Afghanistan.

13. Boston, Massachusetts 

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Hints for walking there:

America’s first subway system is located here.
It is one of the oldest cities in the US and was founded in 1630.
Harvard is located just across the river from this place.

Interesting facts:

It was the scene of several key events of the American Revolution, such as the Boston Massacre, the Boston Tea Party, the Battle of Bunker Hill and the Siege of Boston.
Boston’s many “firsts” include the United States’ first public school (1635) and first subway system (1897).
The area’s many colleges and universities make Boston an international center of higher education and medicine, and the city is considered to be a world leader in innovation for a variety of reasons.
Boston has teams in the four major North American professional sports leagues plus Major League Soccer, and has won 34 championships in these leagues, as of 2013.
Greater Boston has more than 100 colleges and universities, with 250,000 students enrolled in Boston and Cambridge alone.
John Quincy Adams, Ben Affleck, Louisa May Alcott, Steve Carell, and the band Aerosmith are all Boston natives! 

12. Charleston, South Carolina 

charleston

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Hints for walking there:

The nickname of this city is “The Holy City”.
It is the oldest city in South Carolina.
It has been named “America’s Most Friendly City”.

Interesting facts:

Charleston is the oldest and second-largest city in the southeastern State of South Carolina.
It has also been named “the most polite and hospitable city in America” by Southern Living magazine.
Founded in 1670 as Charles Towne in honor of King Charles II of England, Charleston adopted its present name in 1783.
Charleston is famous for its unique culture, which blends traditional Southern U.S., English, French, and West African elements.
Charleston is known for its local seafood, which plays a key role in the city’s renowned cuisine, comprising staple dishes such as gumbo, she-crab soup, fried oysters, Lowcountry boil, deviled crab cakes, red rice, and shrimp and grits. The cuisine in Charleston differs greatly even from the rest of South Carolina, with British and French elements heavily prevalent.

11. Colonial Williamsburg, Williamsburg Virginia 

colonial willimasburg

Hints for walking there:

This place is located in Williamsburg, Virginia.
This place’s motto is “That the future may learn from the past”.
It is a living history museum.

Interesting Facts

Colonial Williamsburg is a living-history museum and private foundation representing the historic district of the city of Williamsburg, Virginia, USA.
The Historic Area is an interpretation of a Colonial American city, with exhibits including dozens of authentic or re-created buildings related to colonial and American Revolutionary War history.
Early in the 20th century, the restoration and re-creation of Colonial Williamsburg was championed by W. A. R. Goodwin and the patriarch of the Rockefeller family, John D. Rockefeller, Jr., along with his wife, Abby Aldrich Rockefeller, to celebrate the patriots and the early history of the United States.
Rather than an effort only to preserve antiquity, the combination of restoration and re-creation of the entire colonial town attempts to re-create the atmosphere and the ideals of 18th-century American people and revolutionary leaders.
Interpreters work and dress as they did in the era, using colonial grammar and diction.

10. Independence National Historical Park, Philadelphia Pennsylvania 

Independence_Hall

Hints for walking there:

This place has been nicknamed “America’s most historic square mile”
This place preserves several sites associated with the American Revolution.
The Declaration of Independence was signed here.

Interesting Facts:

The centerpiece of the park is Independence Hall, a UNESCO World Heritage Site, where the Declaration of Independence and the United States Constitution were debated and adopted in the late 18th century.
Independence Hall was the principal meetinghouse of the Second Continental Congress from 1775 to 1783 and the Constitutional Convention in the summer of 1787
Across the street from Independence Hall, the Liberty Bell, an iconic symbol of American independence, is displayed in the Liberty Bell Center.
The park also contains Franklin Court, the site of a museum dedicated to Benjamin Franklin and the United States Postal Service Museum.
The National Park Service, a federal agency within the Department of the Interior, is responsible for the park’s maintenance and preservation. In the 2003 fiscal year, the National Park Service spent approximately US$30.7 million dollars on the park. 

9. Center of Science and Industry, Columbus Ohio

COSIHolidayPhoto 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Hints for walking there:

This place is located in Columbus, Ohio.
It was opened on March 29, 1964, as a venture of the Franklin County Historical Society.
This place has basketball-playing rats!

Interesting Facts:

COSI features more than 300 interactive exhibits throughout themed exhibition areas – Energy Explorers, Ocean, Space, Gadgets, Life, Little Kidspace, Progress, the outdoor Big Science Park, and Lily Pad, a watershed division of Ocean.
In 2008, Parents Magazine named COSI the #1 Science Center for families in the country.
It features a seven-story Extreme Screen Theater.
As a not-for-profit organization, COSI is supported by ticket sales, a network of community and statewide partnerships, including relationships with a variety of donors, sponsors, 19,000 Member households, and a large volunteer program.

8. The National Air and Space Museum (NASM) of the Smithsonian Institution, Washington DC 

USA-National_Air_&_Space_Museum0

Hints for walking there:

This place is located near the capital of the United States.
This place was formed on August 12, 1946
The world’s largest collection of historical aircraft and spacecraft is housed here!

Interesting Facts:

The National Air and Space Museum (NASM) of the Smithsonian Institution holds the largest collection of historic aircraft and spacecraft in the world in 161,145 square feet (14,970.9 m2) of exhibition floor space.
Because of the museum’s close proximity to the United States Capitol, the Smithsonian wanted a building that would be architecturally impressive but would not stand out too boldly against the Capitol building.
The west glass wall of the building is used for the installation of airplanes, functioning as a giant door.
Some pieces in the National Air and Space Museum collection date back to the 1876 Centennial Exposition in Philadelphia after which the Chinese Imperial Commission donated a group of kites to the Smithsonian after Smithsonian Secretary Spencer Fullerton Baird convinced exhibiters that shipping them home would be too costly.
Controversy erupted in March 1994 over a proposed commemoration of the 50th anniversary of the atomic bombing of Japan.

7. American Museum of Natural History, New York 

USA-NYC-American_Museum_of_Natural_History

Hints for walking there:

It is one of the largest and most celebrated museums in the World.
It is located across the street from Central Park.
It was founded in 1869

Interesting Facts:

The museum complex contains 27 interconnected buildings housing 45 permanent exhibition halls, in addition to a planetarium and a library.
The museum collections contain over 32 million specimens of plants, humans, animals, fossils, minerals, rocks, meteorites, and human cultural artifacts, of which only a small fraction can be displayed at any given time, and occupies 1,600,000 square feet.
The Museum has a full-time scientific staff of 225, sponsors over 120 special field expeditions each year, and averages about five million visits annually.
The Museum boasts habitat dioramas of African, Asian and North American mammals, a full-size model of a Blue Whale suspended in the Hall of Ocean Life, sponsored by the family of Paul Milstein (reopened in 2003), a 62 foot (19 m) Haida carved and painted war canoe from the Pacific Northwest, a massive 31 ton piece of the Cape York meteorite, and the Star of India, one of the largest star sapphires in the world.
On October 29, 1964, the Star of India, along with the Midnight Star, the DeLong Star Ruby, and the Eagle Diamond were all stolen from the Museum.

6. Brevard, North Carolina

Triple_Falls_DuPont_State_Forest

Hints for walking there:

Scenes in the Hunger Games were filmed here!
“Snot Otters” are often found here.
The Flylady calls this place home!

Interesting facts:

The Oprah Winfrey Show was once filmed here.
The movie The Last of the Mohicans was also filmed in Brevard!
The French Broad River in Brevard is the third oldest in the World.
Brevard is located in Transylvania County
The area’s many waterfalls have earned it the nickname,”The Land of Waterfalls.”
The town is home to the Brevard Music Center, one of the nation’s preeminent summer music teaching and performance institutions
Brevard is a well known destination for rock climbers, featuring Looking Glass, Cedar Rock, and many other areas of interest.

5. The Freedom Trail, Boston, Massachusetts 

USA-The_Freedom_Trail

Hints for walking there:

You really can follow the brick road!
This place is 2.5 miles long
Most of the stops are free but some have a small admission fee

Interesting facts:

The Freedom Trail is a 2.5-mile-long (4.0 km) red (mostly brick) path through downtown Boston, Massachusetts, that leads to 16 significant historic sites.
The trail was originally conceived by local journalist William Schofield, who since 1951 had promoted the idea of a pedestrian trail to link together important local landmarks.
Today, people walk on the red path of the Freedom Trail to learn about important events in the American colonists’ efforts to gain independence from Great Britain.
Members of the Boy Scouts of America who hike or camp along the Freedom Trail may be eligible for the Historic Trails Award.

4. Monticello, Charlottesville, Virginia 

monticello

Hints for walking there:

This place was designed by Thomas Jefferson
Thomas Jefferson is buried here
It is designated as a National Historic Landmark

Interesting facts:

Monticello was the primary plantation of Thomas Jefferson, the third President of the United States, who, after inheriting quite a large amount of land from his father, started building Monticello when he was twenty-six years old.
Jefferson’s home was built to serve as a plantation house, which ultimately took on the architectural form of a villa. It has many architectural antecedents but Jefferson went beyond them to create something very much his own. He consciously sought to create a new architecture for a new nation.
Jefferson considered much furniture to be a waste of space, so the dining room table was erected only at mealtimes, and beds were built into alcoves cut into thick walls that contain storage space. Jefferson’s bed opens to two sides: to his cabinet (study) and to his bedroom (dressing room).
In February 2012, Monticello opened a new outdoor exhibit on its grounds: Landscape of Slavery: Mulberry Row at Monticello, to convey more about the lives of the hundreds of slaves who lived and worked at the plantation.

3.Redwood National Park, California 

Redwood National Park

Hints for Walking There:

This place is located along the coast of northern California.
This place became a World Heritage Site on September 5, 1980.
The headquarters is located in Crescent City, California.

Interesting facts:

Comprising Redwood National Park (established 1968) and California’s Del Norte Coast, Jedediah Smith, and Prairie Creek Redwoods State Parks (dating from the 1920s), the combined RNSP contain 133,000 acres (540 km2).
The ecosystem of the Redwood National Park preserves a number of threatened animal species such as the Brown Pelican, Tidewater Goby, Chinook Salmon, Northern Spotted Owl, and Steller’s Sea Lion.
Redwood National Park was created in 1968, by which time nearly 90% of the original redwood trees had been logged.
The Redwood National and State Parks form one of the most significant protected areas of the Northern California coastal forests ecoregion.
The northern coastal region of California, which includes RNSP and the adjacent offshore area, is the most seismically active in the U.S. Frequent minor earthquakes in the park and offshore under the Pacific Ocean have resulted in shifting river channels, landslides, and erosion of seaside cliffs.

2. Niagara Falls, NY

Niagra Falls

Hints for walking there:

This place is split between two different countries.
The name of this place is derived from the Iroquois Indian word “Onguiaahra” meaning “the strait”.
Two daredevils lost their lives here in the past ten years trying to conquer it.

Interesting Facts:

According to the U.S.G.S. of Niagara Falls, it appears that almost 1/3 of the Canadian Falls lies within US Territory and Terrapin Point is in Canada.Straddling the Canadian-United States International Border and both in the Province of Ontario and the State of New York, Niagara Falls attracts some 12 Million tourists to her majestic awesome beauty each year.
Man has not been able to completely control the flow of the water over the falls, even modern engineers have tried. Much of the water today is fed through underground channels and pipes to nearby hydro electric power stations.
The flow of water was stopped completely over both falls on March 29th 1848 due to an ice jam in the upper river for several hours. This is the only known time to have occurred. The Falls did not actually freeze over, but the flow was stopped to the point where people actually walked out and recovered artifacts from the riverbed!
The flow over the American Falls was stopped completely for several months in 1969. The idea was to determine the feasibility of removing the large amount of loose rock from the base of the falls to enhance it’s appearance. In the end the final decision was that the expense would be too great.
In the evenings, intense spotlights bathe the falls with different shades of color.
The first  person to go over the Falls in a barrel and survive was a  63 year old female schoolteacher.
Twenty percent of the worlds freshwater lies in the Great Lakes, and most flows over Niagara Falls.

1. Grand Canyon, Arizona  

Grand Canyon

Hints for walking there:

This place is located in the US in the state of Arizona.
President Theodore Roosevelt was a major proponent of preservation of this area.
The Pueblo people considered this place a “holy site” and made pilgrimages to it.

Interesting facts:

The Grand Canyon is a steep-sided canyon carved by the Colorado River .
It is is 277 miles (446 km) long, up to 18 miles (29 km) wide and attains a depth of over a mile .
For thousands of years, the area has been continuously inhabited by Native Americans who built settlements within the canyon and its many caves.
The Grand Canyon area has some of the cleanest air in the United States.
There are approximately 1,737 known species of vascular plants, 167 species of fungi, 64 species of moss and 195 species of lichen found in Grand Canyon National Park.
Grand Canyon National Park is one of the world’s premier natural attractions, attracting about five million visitors per year .
In 1956 the Grand Canyon was the site of the deadliest commercial aviation disaster in history at the time- 128 people were killed in a two plane air crash .

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